Miniature War Games

Miniature war gaming, using 2mm, 6mm, 10mm, 15mm, 25mm, 28mm and bigger figs to represent troops and armies on the battlefield. Played on your kitchen table, or wherever you have the room.

Volley and Bayonet Road to Glory American Civil War Game

Met with my friend Ron up in Walhalla for our 2nd American Civil War battle using Volley and Bayonet miniatures rules.  This time we would for the first time be using the newest edition of Volley and Bayonet, the Road to Glory set, and using the resources free online, we figured out our own points for the American Civil War armies using the Corps listed in the Original ACW supplement for Volley and Bayonet.

We each had about 3000 points, which is what is recommended in the rules.  My Union troops were looking forward to getting revenge after the Confederates routed them in our first game.   You can see our fist game of Volley and Bayonet for the American Civil War here.

We were both excited to try the Road to Glory system because it has some great methods for allowing you to draw cards and then follow the rules on the card for deploying your left, center, right and reserve wings.  It really gets a person out of the box and keeps a guy like me from having the same old line up across from each other and attack kind of battle.  You will see in our game how it works, and I for one look forward to the many different styles of games this will produce in the future.

Anyway, enough of my rambling since I’m sure you are here to see the pictures and read the battle report, from my Union armies perspective of course. :)  A quick note, we use beads to mark or 6mm figs, green=stationary, yellow=yellow disorder, red=red disorder.

This image is from behind the Union lines.  I had deployed elements of my 10th Corps, 2nd and 3rd divisions on the left.  On their right and in the center of my line I placed the newly raised 5th Corps 1st Division (mostly on a hill, which is hard to see under the cloth in the picture).  To the far right I placed the 5th Corps 2nd Division.  I allocated Corps artillery from both Corps through out the divisions, and all my artillery started limbered.  Finally in my reserve I placed my biggest and most veteran Division, the 1st Division of 10th Corps so I could use them to fill any gaps if the Rebels started to break up my army.  I had drawn card number 26, which is called Full Deployment, so none of my formations were “phantom” formations and would stay on the board.  Since you keep that a secret, I was not sure what formations of Ron’s would stay or were “fake” as of yet, already I was liking this system for a quick pick up game.

Union and Confederate Initial Deployments

Union and Confederate Initial Deployments

The Union won the opening move, so I advanced my line on the left and center, but had my right flank stand to see what the Confederate left flank was planning on the other side of the town.  I unlimbered my guns in the front to start lobbing shells into the rebel lines and started to inflict some casualties. (also note you can click on the images to see more detail if you would like to)

Union Line Advances on the Rebels

Union Line Advances on the Rebels

The Confederates did some minor adjusting by bringing up some artillery battalions on the center of their line and that was it.  Now take a good look at the picture below, because after turn 1 (or if any contact is made in turn 1) any “phantom” wings are removed.  As I told you for me, I had full deployment so no phantom wings for me, but for Ron, he ended up having to remove his Left, Right and Reserve wings.  When you play, you each draw 2 cards and pick one you want.  Later Ron said he took the harder one because he wanted to see how tough it would be.  During the game the card would state if all, some or none of the wings would come back on the board with in 12 inches of the Line of Communication, which in this game was the roads in both of our center wings. (Ill leave his card a surprise so you can see how the game progresses)

Confederate Lines Before Removing Phantom Wings

Confederate Lines Before Removing Phantom Wings

The Start of turn 2 (out of 10) was very interesting.  All of a sudden I found myself with an overwhelming advantage in numbers.  My center went to stationary status (green beads) to give me extra firepower, and my right flank advanced out of the woods and started to move toward the Confederates now that the Confederate left flank was open (yellow beads show their disruption moving out of the woods).  Apparently my bad reconnaissance on both Confederate flanks could be blamed on the fact I had no Cavalry. :)  We are saving using cavalry as we get used to the rules.

With this new development and finding that we had superior numbers, my left flank jumped out on a flank attack with 10th Corps 2nd Division under General Rousseau.  Within an 1/2 an hour (1/2 game turn) 2nd Division was ready to slam into the Confederate exposed left flank.  This was turning out to be an easy win for the Union and I was ready to start telegraphing Washington of my victory!

2nd Division Sets Up for a Deadly Flank Attack

2nd Division Sets Up for a Deadly Flank Attack

Sitting back at my HQ I could hardly wait for the reports of our quick and easy success on the Rebel army.  Much to my horror, reports started pouring in that a Confederate division appeared on the flank of the Union 10th Corps 2nd Division.  Ron’s card pulled off 3 wings, but on turn 2 one of those wings appeared and at the height of my assumed easy victory, I quickly found 2nd Division in trouble of being destroyed by a Confederate flank attack!!  My flank attack was being flanked!! (and I was quickly starting to love this simple but intriguing Road to Glory system created by Frank Chadwick and Greg Novak.)  :)

Union 2nd Division is in Trouble!

Union 2nd Division is in Trouble!

2nd Division 2nd Brigade swung around to meet the full Confederate Division.  1st Brigade started to move up on the flank of 2nd Brigade but wanted to stay out of close range of the Rebel guns.  1st Brigade continued with the initial plan and slammed into the Confederate main line, destroying one artillery battalion and licking its chops as it readied itself for the next artillery battalion.   During the flank attack the main lines of both the Union and the Confederates continued to lob shells int the ranks, causing damage to brigades here and there, but nothing major yet.

Union Flank Attack Swings to Face the Rebels

Union Flank Attack Swings to Face the Rebels

The Confederates held nothing back and slammed into the Union 2nd Division in its entirety.  The Union 3rd brigade was hit on the flank as it prepared to attack down the main Confederate line and it was looking like the Rebel counter attack was going to smash the whole Union attack.  Unfortunately for the Rebels all 3 of their brigades lost and went disordered, but the one shinning spot was the Union 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Division of 10th Corps fell back off the field completely.  Even though it won the melee, it took its last strength point off and was removed, so one of the Rebel brigades didn’t have to fall back.

Confederate Counter Attack

Confederate Counter Attack

Turn 3 for the Union was a 2nd Division counter attack, and 2 of the disordered Confederate brigades lost the melees and routed off the board completely.  This caused the Rebel Division to become exhausted and required a Division collapse check which it failed.  Leaving the lone permanently disordered artillery battalion of the Confederate division all alone as the 3rd and final brigade of that Division routed off the board due to the division collapse and already being disordered.

Union 2nd Division Routes the Confederates

Union 2nd Division Routes the Confederates

Turn 3 for the Confederates saw another Rebel Division show up on the Rebel right flank, it was getting hard for the 2nd Division of 10th Corps to hold the ground, but as you can see in this picture the 1st Division, the pride of 10th Corps was moving out toward the Union left flank, the Reserve wing was being committed.  Both sides continued to lob shells across no-mans land doing slow methodical damage to each line while the battle was being decided on the flank.  A place that the Union troops would soon be calling the “meat grinder”.

Fighting Continues in the "meat grinder"

Fighting Continues in the "meat grinder"

2nd Division continues to hold out, giving better than it was getting, but things were starting to get dicey.  The Elite 1st brigade of the 1st Division charges into a Confederate brigade trying to get on the flank of 2nd Division.  It was a classic American Civil War battle in the making, with units showing up just in right place at the right time, feeding into the battle.  The rest of 1st Division lines up to cover the flank of the “meat grinder” and ready to charge in at moments notice.

The Battle Rages on the Flank

The Battle Rages on the Flank

This proved to be another disaster for the Confederates as more Brigades continue to route off the field.

The Second Collapse of the Confederate Right Flank

The Second Collapse of the Confederate Right Flank

When all else looked grim for the South, four artillery battalions opened up on the two remaining brigades of the Union 2nd Division.  The fire was devastating, and both units were wiped out, the remaining troops fled back to the rear, and the valiant 2nd Division of the 10th Corps collapsed, leaving only the artillery on the field.  The Rebel gunners looked back to the rear and saw another Confederate Division arriving on the field.  The bottle neck called the “meat grinder” was continuing to suck troops into it on both sides.

Union 2nd Division Collapses and Leaves the Field

Union 2nd Division Collapses and Leaves the Field

A slight lull in the fighting as 1st Division pulls itself together for support, brigades on both sides in the center are starting to pull out of the front line as 3-4 hours of artillery shells takes a toll.

A Lull in the Battle

A Lull in the Battle

The final Confederate Division on turn 5 pushes up past the bloody ground of the “meat grinder” and with a rebel yell, prepares to hit the Union 1st Division.  If the Confederates could collapse this Union Division they would then have and open avenue to the Union flank and perhaps save the day!

The Confederates Push On.

The Confederates Push On.

The Union 1st Division is well prepared and being in stationary status, on the next Union turn delivers a devastating blow to the Confederates, the 6’s were a plenty and 2 brigades were removed from the table.  You can also see the Union 3rd Division send a brigade up to protect the two artillery battalions as well.

Volley and Bayonet Road to Glory American Civil War Game.

Hope Starts to Become Lost to the Confederates

In our own little version of Picket’s charge the Confederates try one last desperate attack on the Union 1st Division, with 2 Rebel brigades and 2 artillery battalions.

Desperate Final Charge of the South

Desperate Final Charge of the South

On the Union turn 8 the Union 1st Division moves up into range and pours fire on the Confederates, causing the 3rd and last Confederate Division to collapse.  The Union also got all of its artillery in the center of the line and was starting to pour a devastating barrage into what was left of the Confederate army.

Turn 8, the 3rd Confederate Division Collapses.

Turn 8, the 3rd Confederate Division Collapses.

We planned on 10 turns but at this point there was no way the Confederates would be able to muster up any kind of realistic attack so Ron conceded.

As we talked about the game Ron said he wanted to see how hard card #7 was, “Advanced Guard Echelon Right”  It was an up hill battle to say the least.  I thought it was very interesting because on turn 2 when his division showed up I made a fateful decision to turn and face the attack with 2nd Division, when part of me was contemplating pulling back and securing my left flank.  It seems I was fortunate to stand the ground.  The Union 2nd division destroyed 2 Divisions pretty much on its own, and kept the Rebel army feeding into a bottle neck that they never got out of.  That being said I had some great rolls, and Ron had some bad rolls causing about 4 healthy brigades to completely route off the board.

The Road to Glory system is very simple but it gave us a great game where you had no idea what was coming, or when you would see troops come on the board, if at all.  I look forward to the next battle to see if I’m fighting uphill all game or we are more evenly matched.

If you have any comments please feel free to leave them.  On the upper right hand corner of the home page please sign up for automatic updates on new articles on my blog.  I keep your email for myself and do not sell it or give it to others.  Our game was played at half-scale using Adler 6mm American Civil War figs.

Til next time, may your dice treat you nice!! :)

American Revolutionary War Miniatures and More

American Revolutionay War 6mm Miniatures

American Revolutionary War 6mm Miniatures

Not a lot going on this week for actual games, but lots of good stuff in the hopper for the next couple weeks.  My good friend Ron Tallion and I have been enjoying the game Volley and Bayonet Road to Glory.  We have played some with American Civil War armies, but we both love the American Revolutionary War.  Ron based up some nice looking Baccus 6mm figures to do some solo playing while I worked on my ACW figs.

Anyway, I’m hoping to have a number of articles with some extra free time over the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday weekend, but I thought I would post up some eye candy by Ron.  He does a great job on his figs, he has even been able to teach me some tricks on painting them myself, so I actually enjoy it because my end product doesn’t look half bad.

Here is what he based up quick for playing around.  Still has the flags to add, but man they sure look nice Ron!!

Here is a close up view of some British artillery and some light infantry based for 2/3 scale Volley & Bayonet.

6mm Baccus AWI Figures painted by Ron Tallion

6mm Baccus AWI Figures painted by Ron Tallion

Some Cavalry based up, not much of that especially in the Northern battles, but we got to have some.

British Cavalry American Revolutionary War Miniatures

British Cavalry American Revolutionary War Miniatures

Closer View of the Same 6mm AWI Army

Closer View of the Same 6mm AWI Army

Anyway, I cant wait to do some battles of the American Revolutionary War with Volley and Bayonet.

Over the holiday weekend I’m going to do some Seven Years War using some figures I have based for Age of Reason at 15mm scale.  It will be a small battle with about 12-15 units per side, but boy I can hardly wait.  I’m also hoping to get in a game of Conflict of Heroes board game with a friend I just met online, using the Zun Tzu program that allows you to play online.  Ill try and do battle reports on both of course.

I need to find some time to continue to work on my Perry 28mm American Revolutionary War British that I’m painting as well.  Ron and I should be getting together for our second American Civil War battle around mid December as well, that is going to be a great time.

I’m toying with maybe doing a step by step painting guide of my next unit 0f 28mm British, but not sure it would be helpful to most painters. :)

till next time, Load!  Aim!  Fire!

:)

Volley and Bayonet American Civil War Game

Time for another quick report on some American Civil War gaming.  Ron and I played Volley and Bayonet a couple weekends ago.  I’ve owned the original set of the rules, seen in the first picture on the lower right corner for about 20 years.  In fact they have the old GDW game company logo on them.  The game is designed by Frank Chadwick and Greg Novak.

They are a great set of rules for playing out large battles of multiple corps, so you could literally fight the full battle of Gettysburg in a day on a reasonable size table.

I like to play half scale, which means each of my brigade stands is 1.5 inches square vs. the 3 inches square mentioned in the rules.  This also allows me to play on a half size board, thus turning my modest 8”x 5” table in the basement into the equivalent to a 16×10 table.  The figures in this article are 6mm Adler ACW figures.

In this first picture it is an overall shot of the start, we each started with 2 Divisions on the table of what Volley and Bayonet calls a “tough Corps”.  A tough Corps in Volley and Bayonet has 3 divisions, each with 4 brigades and one battalion of divisional artillery, and also 3 Corps artillery battalions.

Based on the original games point system the Union tough Corps is a little stronger points wise so 2 of the smaller brigades were removed from the 2nd and 3rd Division.   The Union has stronger and more powerful artillery.

So on the right is the Union and to your left is the Confederates.  I was the Union, so I put my strongest Division (1st Division) on the far right flank and then I put the 2nd Division on the left to go after the town if the opportunity presented itself.

Ron set up similar (we alternated based on a die roll and our 3rd Divisions would come in on a die roll and a random road on our side.

volley and bayonet american civil war game

Volley and Bayonet American Civil War Game

Here is another picture looking from slightly behind the South’s right flank toward the town.

We kept the board simple as this was our first game really.  We had played one other time about 2 or 3 years ago, but neither of us would count that as knowing the rules by any means. J

Confederate Right Flank

Confederate Right Flank

On about the 3rd turn (3 hours game time I believe) My Union 1st Division of the Imaginary 10th Corps launched its attack from the woods on my right flank.  I felt the confederates had left their divisional artillery vulnerable  and I would have the opportunity to wipe out that unit giving my Union infantry an advantage.  I didn’t take a ton of pictures, or I should say many didn’t turn out well enough to post, so Ill work on that, but I will tell you it did not go well and with my turn and the Confederate army counter attack, 3 of the 4 1st division brigades routed.  The orange bead you see is used for “out of command” units for now, until we can make some nice game markers.

Union Initial Attack on the Right Flank

Union Initial Attack on the Right Flank

This is a close up of the North’s left flank, we had a big duel with the Corps guns, and the infantry did little, eventually the Confederate Brigade on the Confederates far right was removed by artillery fire but these troops would sit for entire battle, glaring through the town at each other.  The confederates also had one battalion of guns removed along with one for the Union as well.

Union and Confederate Stalemate at the Town

Union and Confederate Stalemate at the Town

This picture isn’t the finale but getting close, my 1st division fell back through the woods and kept trying to hold or counter attack with out much success.

My 3rd division came in on the road to the far right to reinforce, you can see them at the top right of the picture, getting log jammed.  Lucky for me they came out in the right place, but unfortunately so did the extra confederate division, so I was only able to do some damage, but eventually the Union 3rd division and 2nd division would become exhausted and no longer be able to attack.

We use yellow and red beds for yellow and red disorder, lots of color on my Union troops, so not so good for me.

Union 1st Division Falls Back Through the Woods

Union 1st Division Falls Back Through the Woods

The battle continues in full confusion as brigades clash, fall back, and counter attack one another for control of the woods (the green beads represent units that get the stationary benefit in the rules)

Battle for Control of the Woods.

Battle for Control of the Woods.

It’s looking grim for my fictional Union 10th Corps.

North and South Continue to Fight for Control of the Woods.

North and South Continue to Fight for Control of the Woods.

Here is the final picture of the Union right flank.  Many orange beads (for many brigades out of command, and both Union divisions on this flank our exhausted.  Neither Confederate division had exhausted, but if I remember correctly at the end of the game thy were both only one or two away.  At this point I conceded, and my what was left of my Union Corps withdrew from the field.

All and all we loved Volley and Bayonet and have decided to switch to the new Volley and Bayonet Road to Glory.  I have already purchased the rules and although there is not an American Civil War game supplement out yet, it is in the works.  You can play ACW battles with the original rules and there is a vibrant yahoo group for volley and Bayonet and a great website by Keith McNelly with lots of user input and data.  Please check it out when you get a chance, it is well worth it.

Till next time, keep rollin 6’s  :)